Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Seattle PI Reviewer Reveals Best of 2005


A 44-year-old horsewoman turned writer from Lopez Island crafted one of the year's most memorable debut novels, says John Marshall, the PI's book critic. The title? A Sudden Country by Karen Fisher, and it's number one on his list.

Pacific NW Booksellers Announce Award-Winners


How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets, a novel by Garth Stein of Seattle, is one of the six winners of the 2006 Book Awards chosen by the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association.

Da Vinci Code in Paperback This Spring

At last.

Interview: Laila Lalami and Diana Abu-Jaber



Nora McCrea of the 2 Gyrlz Quarterly talks to Diana Abu-Jaber and Laila Lalami "about what it’s like to be an Arab-American writing living and working in the Northwest, confronting intersections of community, polycultural identity, and language."

One Book Wonders and Second-Novel Syndrome


Why did Harper Lee write just one book, To Kill a Mockingbird? Was it fear of failing with a second novel? Or was she just a one-book wonder?

(hey, *everyone* loves this book: 500 Brits polled chose it as their favorite)

Saddam Hussein's Favorite Book


What else? To Kill a Mockingbird.

(speaking of To Kill a Mockingbird, its author Harper Lee apparently does get out sometimes)

Do You Reread Books?


There's a new book out: Rereadings: Seventeen Writers Revisit Books They Love (yes, it's owned by Your Local Library) ... I found out about it through Kate's Book Blog.

Kate asks some very librarianish questions:

"Are you a rereader? Which books do you reread? If you reread childhood favourites, which ones hold up in adulthood for you? Are there books that meant a lot to you once that you’re reluctant to revisit for fear of spoiling the magic?"

Monday, January 30, 2006

Read This: Project X and Others


The San Francisco Examiner pinned down some local authors and asked what they were reading. Laila Lalami takes note in her Moorish Girl blog.

I have to say that Shepard's Project X looks tempting, despite the dark subject matter. If you've read it, let me know what you think.

Here's an interview at IdentityTheory.com with Jim Shepard.

Home Comforts Reviewed


Home Comforts: the Art and Science of Keeping House is a wonderful book, written of course by a perfectionist. Although it is not fiction (heh -- well, maybe for most of us, this book may as well be fiction!), I ran across this review and thought I'd pass along the word. A complementary (and probably more realistic) take on housecleaning would be the books from the indefatigable Flylady.

Gentlemen and Players by Joanne Harris


I'm reading Gentlemen and Players right now and can enthusiastically recommend it. This book truly is "constantly surprising and wickedly fun." Here's the last sentence of the review from the Washington Post: "At the end, you'll gasp so loudly the librarian will throw you out."

In her review, my favorite librarian, Nancy Pearl says, "I was completely bamboozled (as my three year old granddaughter Sarah would say) by the novel's dénouement - I can honestly say that I never saw it coming, even though all the clues are there. So, don't begin this book on what I still, quaintly, call a school night - you won't be able to sleep until the last page is turned. "

The Princess of Burundi by Kjell Eriksson


I found out about the new mystery novel The Princess of Burundi via People magazine's "Picks and Pans". Don't laugh. It looks like they have someone over there who knows a good book when they see it. Anyway, they say this book won the Swedish Academy Crime Writer's Award for Best Novel, putting Kjell Ericksson (what? you don't read Swedish?) in the company of Peter Hoeg and Henning Mankell. Watch for it. It's not yet in the catalog at your local library, but it will be soon. We're getting two copies.

Friday, January 27, 2006


Check out the Inspector Espinosa series. Inspector Espinosa is a member of the Rio de Janeiro police department, "a jaded intellectual who'd rather visit a used bookstore than a crime scene..." The newest book in this series, Pursuit, is just out.

The Chicago Tribune says, "Garcia-Roza is an academic in the tradition of Alexander McCall Smith, but . . . he’s tougher and more sardonic.”

Old Catalog Card Visuals at AAPL


Ann Arbor Public Library has done something cool. You can see pics of old catalog cards on their site...well, actually a simulation of what the card would look like if it existed. Cool!

The Redeeming Power of Fiction


A quote I like, found at Eric Forbes’s Book Addicts’ Guide to Good Books:



We must never
underestimate the
redeeming power
of fiction in our lives.

Patrick O'Keeffe's The Hill Road Wins Big Prize


The Hill Road is available on the shelf here at Your Local Library right now. Patrick O'Keeffe just won a $20,000 prize for this story collection. Must be good.

Monday, January 23, 2006

ALA and Its Cool Stuff

Marin County Free Library has a great blog, and in a recent post, they featured the American Library Association and the cool pro-library stuff they sell. Made me think I should tell you about it, too. And now I have.

Beat the Crowd: Garner by Allio


Garner by Kirstin Allio sounds promising -- and it's the Winter 'Read This!' selection for the LitBlog Co-op -- and, though it's checked out right now, it has no holds at all in this, your local library system.

Go for it.

And let me know how you liked it!

(More reviews here)

Tuesday, January 17, 2006

The Best Recent Books You Probably Haven't Read Yet That You Could Pick Up at Your Library Today


You're no doubt familiar with that sinking feeling of being one of many, many people in line for your library's copies of bestselling titles.

Here is a list of well-reviewed recent titles that probably have no waiting list at all. Why wait when you can read something satisfying right now?

The Algebraist by Iain M. Banks

Lunar Park by Bret Easton Ellis

Six Bad Things by Charlie Huston

Mother of Sorrows by Richard McCann

Kafka on the Shore by Huruki Murakami

These books are from Amazon.com's Editors' Picks: Top 50 Books of 2005. For more booklists, contact Kiera K. Taylor at the Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon 97034, 503-697-6581, ktaylor@lincc.lib.or.us

Flooding in Fiction

Here on the western side of the Cascades we've seen a lot of rain lately. There may be flooding before it's all over.

Here are some novels that feature floods.


Cambor, Kathleen. In Sunlight, in a Beautiful Garden

Carr, Robyn. Down By the River

Faulkner, William. The Wild Palms
hey -- Julia Roberts loves this one!

Hassler, Jon. The Staggerford Flood

Hood, Ann. The Properties of Water

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God

Maine, David. The Preservationist

Morgan, Charlotte. One August Day

Racine, David. Floating in a Most Peculiar Way

Slater, Susan. Flash Flood

Turnbull, Peter. After the Flood

Turner, George. Drowning Towers



For more booklists, contact Kiera K. Taylor at the Lake Oswego Public Library, 706 4th Street, Lake Oswego, Oregon 97034, 503-697-6581, ktaylor@lincc.lib.or.us

Thursday, January 12, 2006

Anticipated Books of 2006





Watch for these books in 2006. A few coming out soon are already in the catalog. Mark your calendar to check for the others later.

Reminder: Fiction Allsorts: a Storytime for Knitters


Knitters and others are invited to bring their handcrafts
to Fiction Allsorts, our Short Story Discussion Group.
It’s a free ‘storytime’ and brief discussion for grownups.
The librarian reads a short story or essay aloud,
and time for discussion or sharing follows.

Where and when? We do this on the
third Thursday of every month;
the next meeting is Thursday, February 16, at 10:30 a.m.
in the library’s conference room.

For more information, contact Kiera K. Taylor,
Adult Services Librarian, Lake Oswego Public Library,
503-697-6581 or ktaylor@ci.oswego.or.us

First Tuesday music schedule

On the first Tuesday of every month, we have MUSIC at the Lake Oswego Public Library. Here's the schedule:

February 7: Upper Left Trio -- jazz trio
March 7: Django's Tigers -- hot club jazz
April 4: Laila and Yohannes Murphy -- flute, guitar and vocals

All programs start at 7 p.m. and end at about 8:30 p.m.

Brought to you by The Library Advisory Board and sponsored by The Friends of the Library.


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Tuesday, January 10, 2006

First Tuesday Music Schedule


On the first Tuesday of every month, we have LIVE MUSIC at the Lake Oswego Public Library. Here's the schedule:

February 7: Upper Left Trio -- jazz trio
March 7: Django's Tigers -- hot club jazz
April 4: Laila and Yohannes Murphy -- flute, guitar and vocals

All programs start at 7 p.m. and end at about 8:30 p.m.

Brought to you by The Library Advisory Board and sponsored by The Friends of the Library.